Take a look at this post… ‘Was mystery man found mutilated on Shankill killed by soldiers, or a victim of Butchers? ‘.

http://seachranaidhe-irishandproud.blogspot.com/2022/04/was-mystery-man-found-mutilated-on.html

Controversies – The Poppy Appeal – The Celtic Wiki

https://www.thecelticwiki.com/about-celtic/celtic-incidents-events-and-controversies/controversies-the-poppy-appeal/

Brainless British, Irish & International Media Responsible For Belfast ‘Riots’ | The Broken Elbow

https://thebrokenelbow.com/2021/04/14/brainless-british-irish-international-media-responsible-for-belfast-riots/

Special RUC unit saved Gerry Adams from assassination by loyalists – BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/sunday-life/news/special-ruc-unit-saved-gerry-adams-from-assassination-by-loyalists-40285529.html

Documents on high profile cases added to Troubles archive

DOCUMENTS detailing high profile cases including the Birmingham Six and Guildford Four are among almost 1,000 records now available to view online as part of a Troubles-related archive.

Gerry Conlon (l), one of the Guildford Four, in London, on the opening of ‘In The Name of the Father’, a controversial film about the plight of the four with Daniel Day-Lewis starring as Gerry Conlon and Pete Postlethwaite (r) as Gerry’s Father, Guiseppe

A batch of 960 documents, covering events related to the North of Ireland from 1986-88, were added to the Conflict Archive on the Internet (Cain) website this week as part of an ongoing partnership involving Ulster University and the National Archives of Ireland (NAI). The history of the unique archive was thrown into doubt earlier this year when Ulster University said that unless extra funding can be found to curate Cain it would become a “static archive” – not a live project which is constantly updated and expanded.

“These records offer an invaluable insight into the difficult years leading up to the eventual ceasefire and peace process in the North of Ireland” Catherine Martin

However, the archive was saved after the Irish government announced funding for a new project which will now be maintained and updated by NAI. The newly released material covers a wide range of topics from the workings of the Anglo-irish Agreement in its initial phase to how the governments in Dublin and London sought to manage their relationship in the face of challenging issues. This included legal debates about about the extradition of those suspected of paramilitary offences or the high profile cases such as the miscarriages of justice of the Birmingham Six and Guildford Four.

The three unarmed IRA victims who were executed by the SAS in the on-going Shoot-to-kill policy in Gibraltar in March 1988

It also includes documents on the IRA Enniskillen bombing in November 1987 and the aftermath of the SAS murders in Gibraltar in March 1988. Catherine Martin, the Republic’s Minister for Media, Tourism, Arts, Culture, Sport and the Gaeltacht, said: “This collaboration between Cain and the National Archives clearly demonstrates the importance and value of providing free access to public records so that they can be used by researchers, academics, teachers, students and the wider public to better understand the social, political and historical contexts that shape our society.

The IRA Enniskillen bombing in November 1987

“These records offer an invaluable insight into the difficult years leading up to the eventual ceasefire and peace process in the North of Ireland.” Dr Brendan Lynn, Ulster University’s Cain deputy director, said: “Ulster University and Cain are once again pleased to have been able to work with the National Archives of Ireland to update the existing section which will now provide users with material spanning the years from 1965 to 1988.

“In addition it has allowed Cain to continue with its long-term objective of working with individuals, groups or organisations with relevant information to produce digital versions of their material and make it much more accessible to a wider audience. “Finally I would like to place on record our thanks to the Reconciliation Fund of the Department of Foreign Affairs for providing the support to allow CAIN to maintain its partnership with the National Archives, Ireland”.

The archive can be viewed at: http://www.httpcain.ulster.ac.uk

With many thanks to: The Irish News and Allison Morris SECURITY CORRESPONDENT –a.morris@irishnews.com

Ireland’s National Conflict Is About Imperialism as Well as Sectarianism

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2020/07/ireland-sinn-fein-ira-one-mans-terrorist

‘No good reason’ not to reveal contentents of files on plastic bullet deaths

A SUGGESTION that the families of two young teenagers murdered by plastic bullets in 1981 (the year the 10 men died on hunger-strike) including Bobby Sands. 

Irish children murdered by British Crown Forces in the occupied six Counties of the North of Ireland

Should use the Freedom of Information (FoI) request to access files on their deaths has been dismissed as “unacceptable”. SDLP leader Colum Eastwood raised the cases of Paul Whitters (15) and Julie Livingstone (14) with Secretary of State Brandon Lewis in the House of Commons yesterday. Paul Whitters was murdered in Derry in April 1981 while Julie Livingstone, was murdered in Belfast the following month. 

Collusion is not an illusion!!!

Government files relating to their killings have been reclassified and closed until 2059 and 2064 respectively despite appeals by their families for access. The family of Julie Livingstone said the decision that no-one who knew the teenager personally would be alive when the file was opened. At Secretary of State’s questions yesterday, Mr Eastwood told Mr Lewis there was “no good reason” to keep the files closed and asked: “Will he now act to allow the parents of those children to see the files?” Mr Lewis said he had “enormous” sympathy for families of those who died during the Troubles, especially children. He said the next step for the families should be to submit a Freedom of Information request to the National Archive. However, Sarah Duddy of the Pat Finucane Centre said Mr Lewis’s suggestion had been dismissed by the families in the past.

With many thanks to: The Irish News and Seamus McKinney for the original story 

 

EAST BELFAST UVF SHOULD HANG YOUR HEADS IN SHAME

EXCLUSIVE 

Members of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)

Loyalist museum cuRATOR IN ASTONISHING ATTACK ON on east BELFAST UVF AS COPS LAUNCH DRUG RAIDS ON CRIMINAL gang

EAST Belfast UVF have been branded coke-dealing thugs i an astonishing attack by the boss of a UVF museum in the area.

Follow this link to find out more: https://twitter.com/LynneCampbell5/status/1275686919255490562?s=20

He hit out as specialist cops busted a suspected drugs ring linked to the gang. Loyalist community worker William McCaughey, curator of a museum dedicated to the UVF, laid into the current paramilitary goons for “torturing” the Protestant people. He accused them of criminality and cocaine dealing saying they should “hang their heads in shame”.  

UVF HISTORIAN SLAMS SECTARIAN TERROR GROUP FOR THE TORTURE OF PROTESTANTS AND TELLS THEM: YOU’RE COKE DEALING THUGS’ 

EAST Belfast UVF has been accused of “torturing the Protestant population” in the heart of East Belfast.

Follow this link to find out more: https://www.facebook.com/913308238745902/posts/3069554353121269/?app=fbl

Respected community worker and UVF historian William McCaughey laid into the current UVF mob who were targeted in yet another anti-drugs sting the weekend last. McCaughey is the curator of the Ballymac Museum which is smack in the heart of what has for years been the heartland of the East Belfast UVF  – making the outspoken dressing down even more unusual. And his brave outburst came as police revealed on Saturday 20th June they had busted a suspected East Belfast UVF drug gang. Officers from the Paramilitary Crime Task Force announced they had searched properties in Dundonald and believe drugs and cash found were linked to the East Belfast UVF. A 40-year-old man has been charged with drug offences and two women were reported to the PPS. The Sunday World understands the raid is highly significant and is closely linked to one of the terror group’s top bosses. A top cop said afterwards the local community “utterly supports” their efforts to disrupt East Belfast UVF. Detective Inspector Hamilton said: “Paramilitaries are not defenders of their communities, instead they are criminals who pretty on vulnerable people and exploit any circumstances they can for their own gain.”

PRISONERS 

And during a five-minute video posted on the Ballymac Friendship Centre’s Facebook page this week, William McCaughey (49) describes the current East Belfast UVF in less flattering terms. The clip entitled ‘Ballymac Museum Tour Part 3’ sees William, who’s listed in the credits as curator of the museum, complete his tour of the museum which largely includes artefacts collected from the Troubles. Having shown us various weapons and trinkets made in Long Kesh prison by UVF prisoners like David Ervine and Gusty Spence, he out-of-the-blue lets rip at the present day UVF. While a music box, made in Long Kesh, plays in the background he says: “It’s usually at this stage of the tour people ask me what has the East Belfast UVF got to do with the museum and my answer has to be, absolutely nothing. “Why? What has cocaine [word inedible], criminality, hiking of bills and general torture of the Protestant population, what’s that got to do with all this rich history?”

Snorting cocaine

But he doesn’t stop his impassioned speech there and even tells the current East Belfast UVF criminal element they should be ashamed. He continues: “Why use them three letters [UVF] and live on the backs of the people in this museum  – the Ulstermen who have defended their wee part of Ulster for hundreds of years? “Hang your heads in shame!” The video was uploaded to the museum’s Facebook page on Monday 15th June and seems to have been done to coincide with the 22nd anniversary of the murder of local UVF hero Robert ‘Squeak’ Seymour. McCaughey adds: “And from a time when East Belfast UVF were the ‘People’s Army’ – Volunteer Robert Squeak Seymour 15th June 1988.” Seymour became a UVF legend during the Troubles for murdering senior IRA man James ‘Skipper’ Burns, for which he was convicted of killing in 1981, though he was later cleared on appeal as he’d been convicted on ‘supergrass’ testimony. Until 2011, Seymour’s image featured on a mural on a gable in the nearby Ballymacarrett Road.

A late 2011 UVF mural, on Ballymacarrett Road in East Belfast. The four members named are Robert Seymour, shot dead by the PIRA; James Cordner and Joseph Long, who were both killed in a premature explosion, and Robert Bennett, killed by the British Army during a riot. These same four are commemorated in the controversial 2013 mural featured in: Follow this link to find out more: https://extramuralactivity.com/2013/12/23/years-of-sacrifice/

Until 2011, Seymour’s image featured on a mural on a gable wall in the nearby Ballymacarrett Road

McCaughey’s sideswipe is being supported by many loyalists. This paper has written extensively about paramilitary drug lords in East Belfast UVF. Many of the old UVF guard have been reported to be ashamed of the actions of the current crop of paramilitary leaders. The Sunday World asked Mr McCaughey for a comment on his statement but we were told by the centre: “Unfortunately at this time William is unavailable for comment.” Sources in East Belfast say the outburst from the community worker, who was until recently was listed as a director of the Ballymac Friendship Centre, shows how sections of East Belfast have turned on the current UVF.
FEEDBACK 
And the positive feedback left by supporters of the museum show many people are fed up with East Belfast UVF. The video clip has been viewed over 7,000 times and been shared 83 times and attracted completely positive comments. One person wrote: “Brilliant William, well said and very well concluded.” Another supporter wrote: “Well said you can’t be a true loyalist and a drug dealer.” Another fan commented: “Thank God someone has had the courage to speak out x.” Things have been going wrong for the East Belfast UVF for a few years but those problems have accelerated following the murder of popular community worker Ian Ogle last year. The Ballymac Museum was started after loyalists got fed up with ‘their’ history being told through the eyes of republicans. In 2015 it received just over £200,000 in public funding to have the centre refurbished.

Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)

A year later Mr McCaughey was quoted in a number of newspaper articles as he gave tours round the new museum, though he was never pictured himself. He said of the UVF memorabilia: “It’s not about glorifying anything, but it’s about the fact you shouldn’t forget about it either, it’s a part of our history here, a part of the history of this area that’s being kept alive. “There’s been Americans in and once they started to realise the conflict here was more complicated that the Irish against British, they were absolutely fasinacinated. It’s also been great for young people in the area who maybe label themselves as loyalist or whatever, but don’t really know what that means. “The history in here helps them understand what their history is. Loyalism, the term, it’s often seen in a bad light, but this is helping show there’s more to it than just the Troubles. It’s a social history and it’s important it’s not forgotten.”

TRYING TO FOOL US: One of the threatening UVF murals in East Belfast. Jamie Bryson unmasked!

A police spokesman said on Saturday June 2oth 2020 of the latest raids targeting the East Belfast UVF: “Following this proactive policing operation a quantity of suspected class A, B and C controlled drugs, cutting agent, bags and scales and a significant amount of cash were seized. “Two women are to be reported to the PPS on suspicion of drugs offences.” Detective Inspector Hamilton said: “We know that the communities most affected utterly support our ongoing efforts and want to work with us to end the harm caused by the criminal activity of paramilitaries.

If Jamie Bryson was not a member of the UVF then why is he pictured here? Reading a statement out on behalf of the East Belfast UVF

” And late on Saturday June 20th 2020, the police confirmed the 40-year-old had been charged “with possession of a class A controlled drug, with intent to supply, possession of a Class B controlled drug, possession of a class C controlled drug and firearms licensing offences,” said a spokesperson. “He is due to appear at Newtownardes Magistrates Court via vidolink on Thursday July 16th 2020. As is normal procedure, all charges are reviewed by the Public Prosecution Service (PPS).”

.With many thanks to the: Sunday World and Steven Moore for the EXCLUSIVE original story  – steven.moore@sundayworld.com 

Follow these links to find out more: https://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/crime/anti-uvf-operation-nets-suspected-drugs-and-cutting-agent-man-charged-narcotics-and-firearms-offences-2890660

(2)-: https://www.belfastlive.co.uk/news/belfast-news/watch-paramilitary-crime-taskforce-raid-18456679

(3)-: http://www.belfastdaily.co.uk/2020/06/20/man-held-over-east-belfast-uvf-drug-dealing-probe/

(4)-: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-northern-ireland-53119053

 

Cases against six retired British soldiers to continue

LEGAL cases in the North of Ireland against six retired British soldiers will not be affected by government efforts to prevent what it has described as “vexatious prosecutions”, it has been reported.

A very rare photograph of ‘Soldier F’ which was taken in Co Derry in 1972

Cases are expected to proceed to trial against six former British soldiers including ‘Soldier F’, who faces murder charges over Bloody Sunday in Derry in 1972. The British government has been preparing legislation claimed to stop “vexatious” prosecutions of soldiers linked to the Troubles. The Sunday Times reported that the legislation will not affect the cases already under way, for which trials are expected to start at the end of this year or early in 2021. Government sources told the paper the legislation would not pass through parliament until the end of this year at the earliest.

“There is no existing mechanism for the government to step in with respect to prosecutions in the North of Ireland that are currently on going,” a senior government source said. “Changing the position regarding the government’s powers over prosecutions in the North of Ireland would require primary legislation and would be contrary to the devolution of policing and justice.” Tory MP Bob Stewart, a retired colonel, told the Sunday Times: “I don’t think this is justice for our soldiers who have been investigated number times and then brought before the North of Ireland courts. The prime minister promised he going to sort this out.” UK defence secretary Ben Wallace defended the government’s plans. “The government has repeatedly committed to ensuring equal treatment for veterans, most recently by the prime minister,” he said. “We continue to work with colleagues to deliver on that commitment and end the scourge of vexatious claims and repeated investigations.”

With many thanks to: The Irish News for the original story 

‘No misconduct’ in RUC/PSNI handling of officer’s affair with ally of gang linked to Ronan Kerr murder

The update was delivered on the day a 36-year-old was sentenced for a weapons find made three days after the murder.

Officers say that the investigation into the murder is the largest ever undertaken by the force and that they have identified the group they believe carried out the car bomb that killed Kerr in April 2011. They also believe they can link this group to other incidents.

imageGavin Coyle, who was today 15th  January 2014 was sentenced to 10 years, leaving Dungannon Magistrates Court in 2011. (Pic: Niall Carson/PA Wire)

The PSNI’s assistant chief constable for crime operations Drew Harris described the investigation into the murder as “lengthy and complicated”:

Although we have yet to bring charges for Ronan’s murder, this investigation, which is the largest in the PSNI’s history, is far from over. Detectives in serious crime branch have linked a total of 17 incidents to the same network of individuals and terrorist groupings. These include attempts to murder other police officers, a bomb attack, arms finds and armed robberies.

“We have made progress and we believe there is potential to bring other individuals before the courts. But we are not complacent,” added Harris.

PSNI constable Kerr was killed when booby-trap bomb went off after he got into his car at Highfield Close in Omagh on Saturday, 2 April 2011.

The PSNI say that the resultant investigation has led to 14 arrests, 123 house searches and the seizure of 7,947 items.

Coalisland guns and explosive seizure

The update on the investigation was provided by the PSNI as 36-year-old Gavin Coyle, of Culmore Road, Omagh, was sentenced to a total of 10 years after admitting having guns and explosives with intent to endanger life and being a member of the IRA. Five years will be in custody with five 

The arms and explosives, which included assault rifles and Semtex, were uncovered by detectives in premises at Mountjoy Road, Coalisland, Co Tyrone three days after the murder of  Kerr in April 2011.

Following Coyle’s sentencing, PSNI officers have released a number of photos of the items seized that led to his conviction.

PSNI close to Ronan Kerr charges as man sentenced over guns and explosive find

PSNI constable Kerr was killed by a booby-trap bomb in his car in Omagh on Saturday, 2 April 

POLICE INVESTIGATING THE murder of PSNI constable Ronan Kerr have said that they believe they are close to making further charges.

The update was delivered on the day a 36-year-old was sentenced for a weapons find made three days after the murder.

Officers say that the investigation into the murder is the largest ever undertaken by the force and that they have identified the group they believe carried out the car bomb that killed Kerr in April 2011. They also believe they can link this group to other incidents.

imageGavin Coyle, who was today sentenced to 10 years, leaving Dungannon Magistrates Court in 2011. (Pic: Niall Carson/PA Wire)

The PSNI’s assistant chief constable for crime operations Drew Harris described the investigation into the murder as “lengthy and complicated”:

Although we have yet to bring charges for Ronan’s murder, this investigation, which is the largest in the PSNI’s history, is far from over. Detectives in serious crime branch have linked a total of 17 incidents to the same network of individuals and terrorist groupings. These include attempts to murder other police officers, a bomb attack, arms finds and armed robberies.

“We have made progress and we believe there is potential to bring other individuals before the courts. But we are not complacent,” added Harris.

PSNI constable Kerr was killed when booby-trap bomb went off after he got into his car at Highfield Close in Omagh on Saturday, 2 April 2011.

The PSNI say that the resultant investigation has led to 14 arrests, 123 house searches and the seizure of 7,947 items.

Coalisland guns and explosive seizure

The update on the investigation was provided by the PSNI as 36-year-old Gavin Coyle, of Culmore Road, Omagh, was sentenced to a total of 10 years after admitting having guns and explosives with intent to endanger life and being a member of the IRA. Five years will be in custody with five on licence.

The arms and explosives, which included assault rifles and Semtex, were uncovered by detectives in premises at Mountjoy Road, Coalisland, Co Tyrone three days after the murder of  Kerr in April 2011.

Following Coyle’s sentencing, PSNI officers have released a number of photos of the items seized that led to his conviction.

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Rónán Duffy

#CAR BOMB

#TROUBLES

RUC/PSNI cleared of misconduct in handling of Kerr murder probe

THE POLICE OMBUDSMAN has cleared the RUC/PSNI of misconduct in its handling of a policewoman’s affair with an associate of a gang linked to Constable Ronan Kerr’s murder.
 
Mr Kerr’s family made a complaint to the watchdog after The Irish News in 2018 revealed the policewoman in Co Tyrone had been reprimanded but allowed to return to work. The family raised concerns about the adequacy of the internal RUC/PSNI probe and whether it impacted on the murder investigation. Mr Kerr, a 25-year-old Catholic policeman, was murdered in 2011 when a booby-trap bomb exploded under his car in Omagh. No-one has been convicted of the murder by dissident republican paramilitaries, although one person (Gavin Coyle) was jailed for offences connected to the investigation. It is understood the man whom the policewoman was involved is associated with members of a criminal gang linked to the killing. The criminal gang is suspected of involvement in the theft of cars for dissidents involved in the murder plot. The policewoman was suspended from duty after the affair emerged and the RUC/PSNI launched an investigation. In 2014, the RUC/PSNI sent a file in relation to the case to the (PPS) Public Prosecution Service, although it decided not to pursue a criminal prosecution.
RUC/PSNI the corrupt police service in the occupied six Counties of the North of Ireland
 
In 2008 several complaints were upheld at an internal disciplinary hearing and the officer’s pay was docked, but she returned to operational duty. Police said it never referred the matter to the Police Ombudsmen because it was “not the subject of a public complaint”. The Police Ombudsman’s office in a statement confirmed the conclusion of its investigation. A spokesman said: “On March 14th 2018, The Irish News published a story that a serving police officer had been disciplined following an internal police investigation into her relationship with a man reported to be associated with members of a gang linked to the murder of Constable Ronan Kerr. “We subsequently received a complaint from Constable Keer’s family which raised concerns relating to the adequacy of the internal police investigation of this matter, and about possible implications for the investigation of Constable Keer’s murder. “We investigated these matters and found that the internal police investigation had been appropriately thorough, and that police had given consideration to any potential impact on the murder investigation. “There was no evidence of any misconduct in the way these matters were addressed by police.”
 
An RUC/PSNI spokesman said the matter had been investigated in 2013 by its Anti-Corruption Unit. “The RUC/PSNI is committed to ensuring that it’s officers and staff behave according to the highest ethical standards and we are committed to working with PONI [Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland] to detect and address behaviour which falls below these standards,” he said. Police said their their investigation into Mr Kerr’s murder is continuing and again urged anyone with information to come forward, “particularly about the origin and sourcing of the component parts of the bomb”. “Since Ronan was killed, detectives have made a significant amount of progress relating to his murder and a series of linked incidents, including attempts to murder other police officers, a bomb attack, arms finds and armed robberies,” they said. “Our resolve and the resolve of Ronan’s family remains as strong today as it was on the day that Ronan was killed. “If you can assist in any way by providing information, please do so. It is the right thing to do. Ronan and his family deserve justice.”
 
With many thanks to: The Irish News and Brendan Hughes for the original story – b.hughes@irishnews.com 
 

 

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