Special RUC unit saved Gerry Adams from assassination by loyalists – BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/sunday-life/news/special-ruc-unit-saved-gerry-adams-from-assassination-by-loyalists-40285529.html

Flag Inappropriate and Offensive” – Boylan

Sinn Féin Assembly Member for Newry Armagh Cathal Boylan has lambasted those responsible for the erection on an SAS emblazoned flag at Loughgall recently.

“Local people living in the vicinity of Loughgall contacted me following sightings of this flag, which is believed to have been erected on 8th May, to express their shock and revulsion at the impliedmessage on the flag.

“As you will note from the photographs the flag has the words SAS 9-0 and what appears to be the SAS insignia. This flag has caused great offence and distress to the families of nine men killed in a most vicious manner by the SAS in Loughgall on May 8th 1987.

“On learning about this flag I immediately contacted the PSNI to request that they make investigations to have the flag removed. I am satisfied to say that this appears to have happened and this flag, which no doubt aimed to offend and to intimidate the local people, is no longer flying.”

LOUGHGALL MARTYRS – ALWAYS REMEMBERED – NEVER FORGOTTEN RIP

FREE THE TRUTH SOMEONE SOMEWHERE KNOWS THE TRUTH !!!

FREE THE TRUTH

POSTED ON BEHALF OF: DERRY SCEAL.

SAS KILLED IRA DUO ” AS THEY LAY INJURED ” !

Mural commemorating those killed in the Loughg...

TWO IRA men were shot dead as they lay wounded after being confrounted by SAS troops who had been keeping them under surveillance, it was claimed at an inquest on Wednsday 14th March 2012.

 Karen Quinlivan, a barrister representing the familes of the two Republicians, challenged soliders claims that they opened fire to protect themselves against armed terrorists in 1990 near a farm outbuildings in Co Armagh. She alleged : ” You make sure the wounded man is no longer wounded, he is dead.” Dessie Grew (37) and Martin McCaughey (23) died in a hail of 72 bullets near the farm buildings in October 1990. Special forces had been monitoring the mushroom shed near Loughgall because they suspected a stolen vehicle inside was to be used for terrorism. While soldiers argued that care had to be taken that suspects could no longer harm them, Ms Quinlivan asked whether they could have disarmed and arrested the two men.

She told a soldier witness at the Belfast inquest : ” After the two men had fallen to the ground in circumstances where they were clearly wounded by high-velocity rounds, which you will acknowledge are extremely damaging, SoldierD fired two shots into Dessie Grew as he ley face down on the ground and it appears also fired a third shot, the fatal shot, into Martin McCaughey’s head as he lay on his back on the ground.” Yesterday was day three (Wednsday 14th March 2012) of the inquest. Soldiers who will appear later are expected to argue that their lives were endangered, Ms Quinlivan said.

Loughgall, Co.

Evidence already before the inquest jury from a doctor who examined the dead IRA men said they were lying near guns and ammunition. Soldier J, an expert in training SAS soldiers, said servicemen may still be under threat even if their target is wounded. Ms Quinlivan said : ” You seem to be suggesting that it is soldiers’ practice to finish off wounded men?” Soldier J responded : ” It is in the soldiers mind tatn if he is approaching someone that may be wounded, may be still armed, may have something that could harm him, it is his responsibility to render that threat no more.” The inquest is one of several so-called security force ” shoot-to-kill ” incidents which have sparked official investigations. The officer commanding at the time, Soldier K, has denied there was a policy of shoot-to-kill.

The inquest continues….

 

 IRA MAN ” DYING ” BEFORE FINAL SHOT.

AN IRA man was already dead or dying when he was shot on the ground from close range by an SAS soldier, a pathologist told a Belfast inquest. 

Dessie Grew ( 37 ) was one of two Provisionals gunned down near sheds under surveillance by special forces for terrorist activity near Loughgall, Co Armagh , in 1990. A total of 72 bullets were discharged at Martin McCaughey,(23) and Grew and a lawyer for their familes has accused a special forces member of finishing them off while they were  lying defenceless on the ground. Pathologist Dr Nat Cary said : ” You could not assume he ( GREW ) was dead but you could assume he was dying of his other wounds. Even when people are critically injured they may last a few minutes.” The inquest is probing one of several so-called security force ” shoot-to-kill ” incidents which have sparked controversy and a series of official investigations. Soldier D admitted firing the final two shots at Grew, claiming he moved as he opened a barn door, causing the former corporal to instinctively reach for his gun. Soldier D denied firing a third bullet at McCaughy’s head while he was lying on the ground. Dr Cary said that, given the number of bullets discharged and the nature of the injuries, it was highly likely that Grew and McCaughey received shots whilst on the ground or partially so.

The inquest continues….

 

WITH MANY THANKS TO : MICHAEL McHUGH, BELFAST TELEGRAPH.

Shoot-to-kill” inquest opens after 22 years of lies

Shoot-to-kill” inquest opens after 22 years of lies.
One of the oldest outstanding inquests in the North of Ireland has finally begun in Belfast.

The inquest into the deaths of two Republicans shot dead in an ambush by an elite British Army unit over twenty years ago began on Monday.

Sinn Féin councillor Martin McCaughey and Dessie Grew were killed near Loughgall, County Armagh in October 1990. Both men were Volunteers in the Provisional IRA.

They were shot close to isolated farm outbuildings at Lislasley outside Loughgall. The building had been under surveillance for some time by the SAS (Special Air Service).

It was always believed the pair were victims of Britain’s ‘shoot to kill’ policy of deliberate political assassination.

In May 2011, the Supreme Court in London finally cleared the way for the inquest to begin. It ruled that a coroner must examine the operation that brought about the killings, and should not be restricted only to the physical means of their deaths, as sought by the British authorities.

Speaking before the inquest got underway, Peter McCaughey, brother of Martin, said: “Our family have always believed that our brother Martin was deliberately targeted and murdered by members of the SAS.

“We have waited over 20 years for an inquest into Martin’s death and at last we will have an inquest which investigates not only whether individual soldiers unlawfully killed my brother, but whether the SAS deliberately set out to kill Martin and Dessie Grew.”

“We hope, now that any restrictions on the scope of the Coroner’s investigation have been lifted that we will finally get justice for Martin and Dessie.”

Mural commemorating those killed in the Loughg...

However, the inquest coroner, Brian Sherrard, initally appeared to accept British claims that the SAS unit feared they would be the ones attacked.

“At the time of opening fire they believed that the men were going to fire on them,” the coroner said, opening the inquest.

Evidence from a doctor who examined the deceased said there were arms in the shed where the men were killed.

Karen Quinlivan, a barrister representing the families of the two republicans, challenged the soldiers’ claims that they opened fire to protect themselves — by pointing to the manner of their deaths, shot in the head as they lay injured.

She told a soldier witness at the Belfast inquest: “After the two men had fallen to the ground in circumstances where they were clearly wounded by high-velocity rounds which you will acknowledge are extremely damaging, ‘Soldier D’ fired two shots into Dessie Grew as he lay face down lying on the ground and it appears also fired a third shot into Martin McCaughey’s head, the fatal shot into Martin McCaughey’s head, as he lay on his back on the ground.”

An individual known only as ‘Soldier J’ — put forward as an expert in training SAS soldiers but who was not involved in the Loughgall operation — said an SAS unit may still feel under threat even if their target is wounded.

Ms Quinlivan said: “You seem to be suggesting that it is soldiers’ practice to finish off wounded men?’

‘Soldier J’ responded: “It is in the soldier’s mind that if he is approaching someone that may be wounded, may be still armed, may have something that could harm him, it is his responsibility to render that threat no more”.

“You make sure the wounded man is no longer wounded, he is dead,” Ms Quinlivan said.

At least 12 British soldiers are due to give evidence and at least six members of the PSNI/RUC.

Forensics experts and a pathologist will also be called as well as three people located in and around the area of the deaths at the time.

POSTED FOR AND ON BEHALF OF : Diann Isleñita Cook

%d bloggers like this: