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Oglach Seamus McLaughlin last farewell from Oglaigh na hEireann. RIP comrade

Oglach, Seamus McLaughlin was returned to Ardoyne for the first time in decades.

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After being forced by the British government into one of the on-the-runs and into exile from his family and comrades by the hostile state of the British Government. He was waked at his ddaughter Hilda’s house in Butler Place in old Ardoyne, his funeral mass took place this morning at 10am today. 10439528_10202932440410973_1988980704731227613_nThursday 12th June 2014. Seamus was a lifelong Ardoyne republican Volunteer and committed republican who defended his district against British Imperlisom. As well as going on the offensive in Britain – courtesy of Whiterock Westrock.

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With many thanks to: Stephen Murney, Èirigi

Leading dissident charged with ‘directing terrorism’

Initial reports claim that staff at Maghaberry prison last week intercepted a letter written by the leadership of the IRA.

POLICE have taken the highly unusual step of charging a leading Derry republican with directing a terrorist organisation.

Irish Republican Army (IRA)

Thomas Ashe Mellon (38), from the city’s Creggan area, is expected to appear at Derry Magistrates Court this morning. Initial reports claim that staff at Maghaberry prison last week intercepted a letter written by the leadership of the IRA. She said that prison officers seized the letter, which was written on cigarette papers joined together, and wrapped in cling film, from a man known only as ‘Mr O’ at the prison last Thursday. Mr O, who police are seeking, walked away, and later on the same day he was seen talking to the defendant outside the Oakleaf on the Glenshane Road. Mellon, a member of one of the city’s best known republican families, is also charged with membership of a proscribed organisation. The charges follow Mellon’s arrest in North Belfast by the PSNI’s serious crime branch early on Friday morning. It is understood his arrest and charge is linked to a police investigation into dissident repubnorthwest vity in the Derry area. The legislation under which h hs been charged has been used sparingly in the north. In more recent years the charge of directing terrorism has been more commonly used in Britain against Islamist factions.

The most high-profile figure successfully charged with directing terrorism in the North of Ireland is former UDA leader Johnny Adair. Adair was charged with directing terrorism in 1995 after undercover police officers recorded months of discussions in which he boasted about his operations with the UDA. The taped conversations provided enough evidence for him to be convicted and sentenced to 16 years in prison. In the Republic, Real IRA leader Michael McKevitt was convicted of directing terrorism in 2003. He was jailed for 20 years after being convicted of membership of an illegal organisation and directing terrorism between dates in 1999 and 2001. Mellon is a veteran republican and has been arrested on numerous occasions. His most recent arrest was last year after police foiled a mortar-bomb attack in Derry.1959680_259976460843470_396264070_n Mellon was arrested at a house in Derry during a follow-up operation after police intercepted four live and primed mortars in a van as it made its way into Derry in March last year. The roof of the van had been removed in preparation for the mortars to be fired. Police insiders believed one of the possible targets was the RUC/PSNI’s Strand Road station. Mellon was later released without charge. Another man arrested in connection with the same incident was subsequently charged and is awaiting sentence. In 1999 Mellon was charged after bomb-making materials were discovered in Co Donegal. He was charged in connection with the discovery at Manorcunningham but was later released when all charges were dropped. The charge of directing terrorism is a particularly difficult one for police to prove. Lawyers beleive for a conviction to be obtained police must either have a confession or use evidence gathered in covert operations. It is understood police in Derry have had access to intelligence material gathered through sophisticated means by the British Army’s Special Reconnaissance Regiment (SRR), the intelligence wing of the SAS. The SRR has been active in the north-west since it was first deployed in 2010 and evidence gathered by the regiment has been used against dissident republicans in recent years. It is also claimed by a hand-writing expert has claimed the writing on the note was matched to Mellon and his DNA was recovered from the glue on the cigaratte papers.

With many thanks to: Seamus McKinney, The Irish News, for the orgional story.

IRA men were shot in the back by SAS soldiers

HET findings published as Haass talks break up without agreement -into ‘Shot-to-Kill’ policy’s in the North of Ireland.

TWO IRA men were shot in the back by SAS soldiers in Co Tyrone 30 years ago, a report has found. The families of Colm McGirr (23) and Brian Campbell (19) on Monday 30th December said they planned to sue the British government and wanted fresh inquests into their deaths.

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The news came as US diplomat Richard Haass failed to make the party’s in the North of Ireland come to an agreement on dealing with the past, parades and flags. Among the issues holding up the progress have been mechanisms for giving evidence to Historical inquires by bodies taking over the functions of the PSNI‘s/RUC‘s Historical Enquires Team (HET) and the Police Ombudsman. The fresh report into the Co Tyrone killings was carried out by a forensic pathologist for the HET. It appears to contradict accounts given by the undercover soldiers who claimed the pair were shot dead while pointing weapons towards them. Mr McGirr and Mr Campbell, who were members of the Provisional IRA, were murdered by the SAS in a  field on Cloghog Road near Coalisland, Co Tyrone, on December 4 1983. A third man was injured but escaped. Their deaths fuelled claims of a ‘shoot-to-kill’ policy by the British government against IRA members.

Testimony from the soldiers had claimed that the men were removing weapons hidden in the field and on being challenged “Colm McGirr turned and pointed a shotgun towards one of the soldiers who then fired several shots at him”. Forensic pathologist Richard Shepherd reviewed the postmortem examination scene photographs and statements from four of the six soldiers prescent. He said he did “not believe Colm McGirr would have turned far enough to threaten soldiers” and “no shots had struck Brian Campbell from the front”. In his report, which the families have received, he concluded that because Mr McGirr was right handed, he did “not believe he would have turned far enough to threaten soldiers” if he was holding a weapon. “In my opinion therefore it is more likely that [Mr McGirr] received shots to his right side and back as he was facing into or towards the bush,” he said. The SAS also claimed one of the squad, known as Soldier A, then fired towards Brian Campbell who was holding an armalite rifle and had also turned and was facing them” However, Dr Shepherd concluded that “no shots had struck Brian Campbell form the front”. “I cannot exclude the possibility that the injury to the left upper back was inflicted as he lay on the ground,” he said, without ruling out the soldiers’ version of events in both cases. The IRA men’s families have now called for a fresh inquest into their deaths/murders. Solicitor Padraig O Muirigh, acting on behalf of the relatives said they would also take legal action against the British government.

“This report raises serious concerns in relation to the original soldiers’ statements,” he said. “In light of the disclosure of the Dr Shepherd’s report the families have made an application to the attorney general to direct a fresh inquest into the deaths/murders of Colm McGirr and Brian Campbell. “They will also be issuing civil proceedings against the minister of defence in relation to the unlawful actions of the soldiers.” Colm McGirr’s brother Brian (58), from Coalisland, claimed the British army discovered the arms cache three days earlier on December 1, but the weapons were not removed or disabeled. “We have no doubt that a carefully planned ambush was set by undercover British security forces that evening,” he said. “Through the 30 years that have passed we have sought the truth of what happened. We were led to bbelieve that the PSNI’s/RUC’s Historical Enquiries Team would make every effort to achieve the truth. “As part of this, a second pathologist has confirmed that the shootings could not have happened as described by security forces. Both men, Colm and Brian, were shot in cold blood in the back.” Mr McGirr said the families have been informed that the HSE investigation “is at an end and will proceed no further”. “We lived with a charade of an inquest in early years with no evidence of any sort offered as to what occurred. The McGirr and Campbell families will continue to demand that a new inquest is held to fully investigate all that occourred on that evening.” Reacting to the findings on Monday nnight, Dungannon Independent Republican councillor Barry Monteith said he was “not surprised” by the pathologist’s review and accused the British government of operating a ‘shot-to-kill policy in the North of Ireland. However, Dungannon DUP councillor Samuel Brush said he had no confidence in the HET. “There are dozens and dozens of murders around this area in South Tyrone that have not been looked at,” he said. “It baffles me that these things didn’t ccome to light then and can be turned up. “All we can do is work on reports as they come but is this report any better or any worse than the previous ones?”

With many thanks toto: The Irish News.

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Belated truth on MRF proves that republican claims were right!!!

Letter which was published in today’s Irish News – Monday December 16 2013 – Martin Galvin, Bronx, New York.

FERGAL Hallahan was more right than he imagines (November 25) about the derision accorded anyone with the temerity to accuse Britain of deploying a Military Reaction Force (MRF) of plain-cloths British troopers who gunned down unarmed nationalists using non-military weapons.

British State Sponsored Murder

During my years as both editor of the Irish People weekly American newspaper and national director of Irish Northern Aid, I was tasked with presenting such facts to the American public and especially congressmen. The contention we republicans repeatedly made was that the crown had sent out the MRF and later wiped British fingerprints from their killings by shifting from the MRF to having the shots fired by loyalist proxies. This tactic had obvious advantages, including avoiding British army ccasualties like those inflicted by the IRA at the Four Square Laundry. It allowed the British plausible deniability. Collusion in murders carried out by loyalists could be denied outright and blamed on a cadre of crown force bad apples, no matter how much targeting intelligence, agent control or safe passage the British had supplied. Britain’s answer to these charges never changed. British officials would declare, self-righteously that “Her Majesty’s government” would never stoop to deploy such a unit. The British army ‘yellow card’ rules were sacrosanct, they scoffed and this code was rigorously applied whenever British troopers opened fire.

These sanctimonious British denials were believed by the public, politicians and journalists to the extent that this handpicked death squard remained largely unknown to the public. Panorama’s Britian’s Secret Terror Force proves that republicans were right about Britain’s deployment of a terror force, the MRF. It proves that those high-ranking British officials who denied that the crown would stoop to such tactics were either deliberately misled by the crown or deliberately misleading others on the crown’s behalf. Members of this British terror squad have no worries that they will face justice for killing unarmed Irish civilians like Daniel Rooney or Patrick McVeigh. They freely boast of their misdeeds, for the television cameras. Confident that they enjoy a selective immunity and impunity, not granted to republicians like Gerry McGeough, Seamus Kearney or John Downey.  We republicans were right about Britain’s tactical shift from the MRF terror force to doing their ‘dirty war’ work through loyalist proxies. Must we await another documentary before people face the facts about Britain’s complicity with loyalist killers in collusion murders?

With many thanks to: Martin Galvin.

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IRA manifesto in response to the Free State declaring itself a Republic in 1949

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Cumann Sean MacEachaidh

MANIFESTO

In View of the deliberate attempt to misrepresent the situation arising from the repeal of the external relations Act, the Army Council of Óglaigh na h-Éireann considers it desirable to issue a statement defining clearly the actual position.

By an Act of the British Parliament passed at Westminster in 1920, in the deliberate absence of the entire Irish Representation and through the acceptance of the Articles of Agreement for a Treat, the Irish Republic proclaimed in arms Easter 1916

And ratified in 1919 by the elected representatives of the People of all Ireland – was prevented from functioning, an in its stead two Partition Parliaments were set up to Govern Ireland.

Thus Ireland was Forcibly partitioned by England and has remained Partitioned since. Any attempt to give the Twenty-six County area a new status by representing it as “The Republic of Ireland” does not and cannot alter this fundamental fact.

England still retains direct control over six counties of Irish territory, and maintains within the area an army of occupation.

While that position remains Republicans cannot concede the claim that Ireland’s centuries-old struggle for freedom is ended.

In the circumstances those owing allegiance to the Republic cannot, without sacrifice of their principles, give allegiance to either of the Partition institutions created by Britain, or recognize that the repeal of the External Relations Act is anything better than a political manoeuvre to mislead the Irish People in to the belief that the freedom of Ireland has been achieved.

While any sod of Irish territory remains occupied by the army of a foreign country, it cannot be truthfully stated that the Republic of Ireland has been restored and so it remains the duty of all Republicans to continue their efforts to rid Ireland of the last vestiges of foreign rule.

Issued by the Army Council Óglaigh na h-Éirean January 1949

Oglach Kevin Barry – Fuair se bas ar son Saoirse ahEireann R.I.P

Oglach Kevin Barry – Fuair se bas ar son Saorise ahEireann.

Creggan Man

1920: Execution of Kevin Barry

Eighteen year old medical student Kevin Barry is executed following an ambush on British troops in Dublin in which one soldier is killed.

On the morning of 20 September 1920, Kevin Barry went to Mass and received Holy Communion, he then joined a party of IRA volunteers on Bolton Street in Dublin. Their orders were to ambush a British army truck as it picked up a delivery of bread from a bakery and capture their weapons. The ambush was scheduled for 11AM, which gave him enough time to take part in the operation and return to UCD in time for a Medical examination he had at 2PM. Captured at the scene, Barry was court martialled and hanged in Mountjoy Jail November 1st 1920. He was the first Republican to be executed since the leaders of the Easter Rising of 1916. The execution of Barry led to a swell of support for the Independence struggle, both nationally and internationally.

The image attached is a poignant letter from an 18 year old boy about to meet his end.

Kevin Barry

youtube.com

Gerry Duddy

Volunteer Kevin Barry, C Company of the first Battalion of the Dublin Brigade, A TRUE AND BRAVE IRISH SOLDIER. R.I.P.

Ex-IRA prisoner sees early release licence suspended

‘The secretary of state’s priority is the safety of the people of Northern IrelandNorthern Ireland Office spokesperson.

A FORMER IRA prisoner facing charges connected to a gun attack has had his early release licence suspended by the Secretary of State Theresa Villiers.

Thomas (Ta) McWilliams (47)

Thomas (Ta) McWilliams (47), from North Belfast, is on remand in Maghaberry Prison after being charged with attempting to murder police and possession of an assault rifle with intent o endanger life. The charges arose out of a gun attak on polic during rioting in Ardoyne on July 12 last year  when a number of shits were fired. McWilliams had previously served seven years in jail for kiling Norman Truesdale (39) in March 1993. He was released on licence in 2000 under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement. Mr Truesdale was shot dead in his shop in the Oldark Road in North Belfast. The IRA later said he was a member of a loyalist paramilitary organisation – a claim denied by his family. A UDA mural in his memory was later painted on a gable wall in the area.

During a court hearing last year it emerged that police beleive McWilliams drove a car contining the gun used in the attack away frm the scene. A spokesperson for the Northern Ireland Office said Ms Villes suspended McWilliam’s release licence “on the basis of information presented to her indicting that he has breached the conditions attached to his licence, including the condition that he must not becme a danger to the public”. “Mr McWilliam’s case will now be reveiwed by the independant sentence reveiw commissiiners who will determine whether to revoke or reinstate his licence,” she said. “The secretary of state’s priority is the safety of the people of Northern Ireland. The givernment will not hesitate to the use all the powers at its disposal under the law to counter the residual terrorist threat.”

With many thanks to : Connla Young, The Irish News.

Remembering The Gilbraltar Three – Premeditaded Point Blank Murder

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Denise Cannon

Operation Flavius was the name given to an operation by a Special Air Service (SAS) team in Gibraltar on 6 March 1988 tasked to prevent a Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb attack. Although the

intention of the operation was stated to be an arrest operaion, it ended with McCann,

Savage and Farrell dead.

The report by Amnesty

International stated that the

inquest failed to answer ‘the fundamental issue, whether the fatal shootings were caused by what happened in the street, or whether the authorities planned in advance for the three to be shot dead.’

Oglach Jim Bryson and Oglach Patrick Mulvenna who died on Active Service 31 August 1973 R.I.P

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The Irish Brigade

Remembering today the deaths of Oglach Jim Bryson and Oglach Patrick Mulvenna who died on active service 31st August 1973 both volunteers were shot during gun battle from concealed British Army observation post while alighting from car, Ballymurphy Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast. Fuair siad bas ar son na saoirse na hEireann

Army concedes for the first time it did not win the battle against the IRA

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Army paper says IRA not defeated.

Friday, 6 July 2007, 19:21 GMT 20:21 UK

Army concedes for first time it did not win the battle against the IRA

An internal British army document examining 37 years of deployment in Northern Ireland contains the claim by one expert that it failed to defeat the IRA.

The admission is contained in a discussion document released by the Ministry of Defence after a request under the Freedom of Information Act.

The 100 page document analyses in detail the army’s role over 37 years.

It focuses on specific operations and gives an overview of its performance.

The six-month study, covering the period 1968-2005, was prepared under the direction of the then chief of general staff, General Sir Mike Jackson.

The document, obtained by the Pat Finucane Centre, points to a number of mistakes, including internment and highlights what lessons have been learnt.

It describes the IRA as “a professional, dedicated, highly skilled and resilient force”, while loyalist paramilitaries and other republican groups are described as “little more than a collection of gangsters”.

It concedes for the first time that it did not win the battle against the IRA – but claims to have “shown the IRA that it could not achieve its ends through violence”.

In a statement, the Pat Finucane Centre – a human rights group – said the document “betrays a profoundly colonial mindset towards the conflict here and those involved in it”.

“Loyalist violence and the links between loyalist paramilitaries and the state has been airbrushed out of this military history,” it said.

In a statement issued on Friday, an Army spokesman said: “This publication considers the high level general issues that might be applicable to any future counter-terrorist campaign that the British Armed Forces might have to undertake.

“It is critically important to consider what was learned by those who served in Northern Ireland.”

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