Delay in extradition proceedings against Liam Campbell ‘shameful’ court hears

This story appeared in The Irish News on Wednesday June 10th 2020

Liam Campbell was found civilly liable for the 1998 Omagh bombing
THE delay in extradition proceedings against Liam Campbell, who was found civilly liable for the Omagh bombing and is wanted on weapons trafficking charges in Lithuania, is “shameful”, the High Court in Dublin has heard. Campbell (58) was arrested in Upper Faughart, Dundalk, Co Louth, on the foot of a European Arrest Warrant issued by Lithuanian authorities. It states that he allegedly organised the preparation for the smuggling of weapons in support of the “terrorist grouping” the Real IRA between the end of 2006 and the beginning of 2007. Barrister Remy Farrell, for Campbell, told the High Court on Tuesday June 9th that the objection to extradition was based on the length of time his client has been subject of the warrant and he could be subjected to “inhuman or degrading treatment” in another EU prison.

Omagh bombing carried out by the RIRA in 1998


Mr Farrell said Lithuanian authorities were “culpable with a capital C” over the delay, which amounted to an “abuse of process”, having been seeking his client’s extradition for more than 10 years. The court previously heard that an issue had arisen over the independence of the Lithuanian public prosecutor, which was referred to the European courts by the Supreme Court. In May last year, the EU Court of Justice of the European Union found that the prosecutor general of Lithuania can be considered a “judicial authority” capable of issuing European Arrest Warrants. 

Patrick McGrath, representing the Republic’s Minister for Justice and Equality, said he would consent to a bail variation so that Campbell could be released of a signing-on obligation at a Garda station. Ms Justice Aileen Donnelly, granted continuing bail, adjourned the matter to the following month July 13th 2020, adding that she would be working on a judgement in the interim. Campbell was not present in court.

With many thanks to: The Irish News for the original story 

‘BIGGEST CYBER-ATTACKER’ WORKED IN VAN

‘The largest assault clocked in at 300 billion bits per second

A DUTCH citizen arrested in northeast Spain on suspicion of lunching what is described as the biggest cyber-attack in internet history operated from a bunker and had a van capable of hacking into networks anywhere in the country, officials have said.

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The suspect traveled in Spain using his van “as a mobile computing office, equipped with  various antennas to scan frequencies,” an interior ministry statement said. Agents arrested him on Thursday 25th April in the city of Granollers, 22 miles north of Barcelona, complying with a European arrest warrant issued by Dutch authorities. He is accused of attacking the Swiss-British anti-spam watchdog group Spamhaus, whose main task is to halt ads for counterfeit Viagra and bogus weight-loss pills reaching the world’s inboxes. The statement said officers uncovered the computer hacker’s bunker “from where he even did interveiws with different international media”. The 35-year-old, whose birthplace was given as the western Dutch city of Alkmaar, was identifed only by his initials : SK. The statement said the suspect called himself a diplomat belonging to the “Telecommunications and Foreign Affairs Ministry of the Republic of Cyberbunker”.

Spanish police were alerted in March by Dutch authorities of large denial-of-service attacks being launched from Spain that were affecting internet servers in the Netherlands, Britain and the US. These attacks culminated with a major onslaught on Spamhaus. The Netherlands National Prosecution Office described them as “unprecedentedly serious attacks on the non-profit organisation Spamhaus”. The largest assault clocked in at 300 billion bits per second, according to San Francisco-based CloudFlare, which Spamhaus enlisted to help it weather the onslaught. Denial-of-service attacks overwhelm a server with traffic, jamming it with incoming messages. Security experts measure the attacks in bits of data per second. Recent cyberattacks – such as the ones that caused persistent outages at US banking sites late last year – have tended to peak at 100 billion bits per second, one third the size of that experienced by Spamhaus. Dutch, German, British and US police forces took part in the investigation leading to the arrest, Spainish officials said. The suspect is expected to be extradited from Spain to face justice in the Netherlands.

With many thanks to : Irish News.

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