Blog Archives

Matthew Talbot was born on May 2nd 1856, the second of 12 siblings, in Dublin, Ireland.

He had three sisters and nine brothers, three of whom died young. His father Charles was a dockworker and his mother, Elizabeth, was a housewife. When Matthew was about 12 years old, he started to drink alcohol. His father was a known alcoholic as well as all his brothers. The eldest brother, John, was the exception. Charles tried to dissuade Matthew with severe punishments but without success.Matthew worked as a messenger boy when he was twelve and then transferred to another messenger job at the same place his father worked. After working there for three years, he became a bricklayer’s laborer. He was a hodman, which meant he fetched mortar and bricks for the bricklayers. He was considered “the best hodman in Dublin.As he grew into an adult, he continued to drink excessively, He continued to work but spent all his wages on heavy drinking. When he got drunk, he became very hot-tempered, got into fights, and swore. He became so desperate for more drinks that he would buy drinks on credit, sell his boots or possessions, or steal people’s possession so he could exchange it for more drinks. He refused to listen to his mother’s plea to stop drinking. He eventually lost his own self-respect. One day when he was broke, he loitered around a street corner waiting for his “friends”, who were leaving work after they were paid their wages. He had hoped that they would invite him for a drink but they ignored him. Dejected, he went home and publicly resolved to his mother, “I’m going to take the pledge.” His mother smiled and responded, “Go, in God’s name, but don’t take it unless you are going to keep it.” As Matthew was leaving, she continued, “May God give you strength to keep it.Matthew went straight to confession at Clonliffe College and took a pledge not to drink for three months. The next day he went back to Church and received communion for the first time in years. From that moment on, in 1884 when he was 28 years old, he became a new man. After the he successfully fulfilled his pledge for three months, he made a life long pledge. He even made a pledge to give up his pipe and tobacco. He used to use about seven ounces of tobacco a week. He said to the late Sean T. O’Ceallaigh, former President of Ireland, that it cost him more to give up tobacco that to give up alcohol.The new converted Matthew never swore. He was good humored and amicable to everyone. He continued to work as a hodman and then as a laborer for timber merchants. He used his wages to pay back all his debts. He lived modestly and his home was very spartan. He developed into a very pious individual who prayed every chance he got. He attended Mass every morning and made devotions like the Stations of the Cross or devotions the Blessed mother in the evenings. He fasted, performed acts of mortification, and financially supported many religious organizations. He read biographies of St. Teresa of Avila, St. Therese of Lisieux, and St. Catherine of Sienna. He later joined the Third Order of St. Francis on October 18, 1891 even though a young pious girl proposed to marry him. Physically, he suffered from kidney and heart ailments. During the two times he was hospitalized, he spent much time in Eucharistic adoration in the hospital chapel. Eventually, Matthew died on June 7, 1925 while walking to Mass. He was 69 years old. Here is a wonderful quote from Matthew to remember:Three things I cannot escape: the eye of God, the voice of conscience, the stroke of death. In company, guard your tongue. In your family, guard your temper. When alone guard your thoughts.”

With many thanks to: Irish History discussion and debate group.

The 19th March marks the 13th anniversary of my old comrade Charlie Ronayne (Midleton Co. Cork), who died in 2004.

Left to Right: Jim Lane. Charlie Roayne – O’Mahony, Seán Murry, ‘Gypo’ O’Mahony and Jerry Madden.

Charlie and I first met as we went together with others, across the Border on 11th December 1956 to fight the forces of occupation in the Six North Eastern Counties of Ireland.

18 Cork IRA Volunteers went on active service the following night, 12th December 1956. The attached photo was taken at Easter 1960 in Trafalgar Square, London. All 6 in the photo were Irish Republicans. In 1962, Charlie was best-man at my wedding. In later years, Charlie was a Town Councillor representing Sinn Fein on Midleton Town Council. He was re-elected several times. We remained the best of comrades all through the remainder of his life. Ní beidh a leitéid ann arís.

 

With many thanks to: Jim Lane, Ann Connolly. 

Christina ‘Dina’ Hunter was born in 1901. At the time the Hunter family were living in a one room tenement at number 7 McGuinness Court.

Her father was a coach painter, while her mother, Sarah was a house kepper. They already had a two-year-old son John. They would later move to number 25 Townsend Street, another one room tenement, and the family would expand to include Sarah, Liziebeth and Jane Frances.

image

Christy and Dina Crothers nee Hunter

https://m.facebook.com/dakota29#!/groups/250140148442168?view=permalink&id=798365180286326&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity

image

Kathleen Lynn.

image

The Funeral of Thomas Ashe.

image

Sean Hunter (Johnny).

With many thanks to: Gillean Robertson Miller –
http:// https://m.facebook.com/groups/250140148442168?view=permalink&id=798365180286326&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity#!/gillean.miller?fref=nf&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity

1916 Easter Rising Historical Society.
http:// https://m.facebook.com/groups/250140148442168?view=permalink&id=798365180286326&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity#!/groups/250140148442168?ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity

James Fintan Lalor, the real Revolutionary of ’48’, was born March 8th, 1807, at Tenaill, Abbeyleix.

Sent to Carlow Lay College, 1825. On leaving college he was apprenticed to Dr. Jacob of Maryborough. He only remained eighteen months there, when he left suddenly and embarked for France.

image

https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=465806823528008&id=100002960821847&set=a.276723952436297.57271.100002960821847

With many thanks to: James Connolly (James Connolly Association Australia):
http:// https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=465806823528008&id=100002960821847&set=a.276723952436297.57271.100002960821847#!/jamesconnollyassociation

James Fintan Lalor, the real Revolutionary of ’48’, was born March 8th, 1807, at Tenaill, Abbeyleix.

Sent to Carlow Lay College, 1825. On leaving college he was apprenticed to Dr. Jacob of Maryborough. He only remained eighteen months there, when he left suddenly and embarked for France.

image

https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=465806823528008&id=100002960821847&set=a.276723952436297.57271.100002960821847

With many thanks to: James Connolly (James Connolly Association Australia):
http:// https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=465806823528008&id=100002960821847&set=a.276723952436297.57271.100002960821847#!/jamesconnollyassociation

%d bloggers like this: