Some prison deaths in the North of Ireland ‘could have been avoided’

Maghaberry Prison: A report in May 2015 labelled Maghaberry one of the most dangerous prisons in Western Europe Image copyrightMICHAEL COOPER/PA

Some of the 23 deaths in NI jails in the last five years could have been avoided, according to the head of the body that inspects prisons.

Brendan McGuigan, chief inspector of Criminal Justice NI, said he was “frustrated” more has not been done to improve prisoners’ safety.

A report has highlighted concerns about suicide and bullying in prisons.

The prison service and South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust said they would “carefully consider” the report.

The inspection report was compiled by the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) and the CJI and looked at the standards of prisons at Hydebank Wood, Maghaberry and Magilligan.

Mr McGuigan told the BBC’s Good Morning Ulster programme that problems had been highlighted some time ago.

“Three years ago, we had the ministers of health and justice ordering a review in terms of vulnerable prisoners – three years later that still hasn’t been published,” he said.

“I find that amazing to be honest with you.

“This was a priority for them, there had been a cluster of deaths in custody and still we don’t have that review published. I think it’s a disgrace.”

The director general of the NI Prison Service, Ronnie Armour, said he was surprised by Mr McGuigan’s comment that some of the deaths could have been avoided.

He said he understands that nine of the 23 deaths were from natural causes.

Brendan McGuigan welcomed improvements made by the NI Prison Service but called on more to be done

“Every death in custody is one too many, but I have to be honest with the public and say that having a strategy in place, important as that is, will not necessarily save a life in a prison,” he said.

“What’s really important is what the South Eastern Trust and prison officers are doing on the landing.”

The report also says prisoners’ access to illegal and prescription drugs must be addressed.

Mr McGuigan has called for better co-operation to tackle the problems.

He said many prisoners arrived with “significant diagnosed and undiagnosed healthcare needs and for those with mental health issues, personality disorders, drug or alcohol addiction or learning difficulties, imprisonment can be a time of great vulnerability”.

‘Illegal drugs’
He said a previous report in 2014 made recommendations to the Northern Ireland Prison Service (NIPS) and South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust (SEHSCT) to ensure prisoners were cared for and supported.

“When inspectors returned in 2018, we found that bullying remained a significant issue and, as a result, have repeated our recommendation that NIPS should as a priority, review its violence reduction and anti-bullying strategy and this work should be completed within six months,” said Mr McGuigan.

Gate at Maghaberry Prison: The report highlighted concerns about suicide and bullying in prisons

“We welcome the steps taken by the NIPS to reduce the supply of drugs coming into prison but I believe more needs to be done jointly by the NIPS and SEHSCT to tackle prisoners’ access to illegal drugs and the diversion and abuse of prescription medication.”

He added that “while at an operational level” the partnership between the prison service and the trust had improved, “difficulties at a strategic level had contributed to the slow pace of progress”.

Mr McGuigan said: “I acknowledge there have been a number of incidents where the prompt actions and interventions of staff have undoubtedly saved lives and that there are many committed and dedicated individuals who are working to ensure the prisoners within their care are kept safe and secure.”

Earlier, Mr Armour and South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust (SEHSCT) Director of Prison Healthcare, Bria Mongan, issued a joint statement responding to the report.

It said: “We will carefully consider the recommendations in the report and while significant progress has been made in the 14 months since the inspection was carried out, we will continue to develop our work.

“Keeping people in our care safe is a priority for everyone working in our prisons.”

It added: “It is no exaggeration to say prison officers and healthcare staff save lives.”

With many thanks to: BBC NewsNI for the original story 

THE GUN USED IN THE MURDER OF STEPHEN CARROLL FOUND AFTER TIP-OFF!!!

SOLICITORS acting on behalf of (Craigavon Two) two men convicted of the murder of PSNI/RUC police officer Stephen Carroll have written to the Public Prosecution Service (PPS) after new details about the case were made public.

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Brendan (Yandy) McConville and John Paul (JP) Wootton - wrongly convicted of murder

Brendan (Yandy) McConville (43) and John Paul (JP) Wootton (23) were convicted of killing the officer in Craigavon in March 2009. Both men have denied any part in the Continuity IRA (CIRA) attack that claimed the PSNI/RUC man’s life as he answered a 999 emergency call. It emerged this week, in a European Court judgement, that the gun used to kill Constable Carroll, pictured below, was discovered by police after a tip-off by a suspect, who was in custody at the time.

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Constable Stephen Carroll

The suspect is referred to in court papers only as RE. The suspect was initially charged with withholding information about Mr Carroll’s murder but these charges were subsequently dropped in mid 2010. Brendan McConville’s solicitor Darragh Mackin, of KRW Law, has written to the PPS requesting notes taken during police interviews with RE and asking what happened to the charges levelled against him.
Details of the case emerged after RE took a case against the British government over concerns that the PSNI/RUC was carrying out surveillence of conversations between him and his solicitor.

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Justice for the Craigavon Two #JFTC2

The man was arrested and questioned three times in the weeks after the officer was killed. Court papers reveal that he was assesssed by a medical officer as a “vulnerable person” and therefore should not have been interviewed – unless in exceptional circumstances – in the absence of an appropriate adult. Court papers reveal that before being seen by a solicitor or appropriate adult the man asked to speak to investigating officers “off the record”. During the course of that interview he “gave information which led to the recovery of the gun used in the constable’s murder.”

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#JFTC2

His solicitors subsequently brought a separate case on his behalf to the European Court which this week found that secret surveillance carried out on solicitors and their clients is in breach of European Law. During the first two periods of detention his solicitor received assurances that consultations would not be subject to covert surveillance. During a third arrest the PSNI/RUC refused to give an assurance.
The court ruling found that the man’s Article Eight rights under the European Court of Human Rights had been violated.
Article Eight protects the right for private and family life, home and correspondence.

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Nichola Harte, of Harte, Coyle, Collins Solicitors, who represented RE, said the ruling has wider implications. “The European Court criticised the inadequate procedures currently in place in the North of Ireland for the handling, use, storage and destruction of information obtained from covert surveillance of legal consultations,” she said. “The police arrangements were and continue to be a violation of the right to respect for private life. “This landmark European ruling has implications for all legal consultations in police stations if subjected to covert surveillance.”
With many thanks to: Connla Young, The Irish News. For the origional story.

Justice for the Craigavon Two

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PERPETUATING INJUSTICE.

Perpetuating injustice

MI5, the British army and the PSNI have colluded to perpetuate the injustice we ‘The Craigavon Two’ continue to face.

That much is clear from the facts that emerged during our ‘show trial’ and subsequent appeal. The deletion of information to cover up wrong doing, the intimidation of key defence witnesses and the withholding of evidence able to undermine the state allegations serve to prove that. Sinn Féin’s John O’Dowd spoke recently of ‘war junkies in suits’ working to perpetuate conflict. What he has failed to comment on is the ways in which this has manifested itself. These very same people (Shame Fein) and organisations have directly contributed to the wrongful imprisonment of two of his constituents. If his concern is genuine, will he now commit himself and his party to calling for an investigation into the role of state actors, including the PSNI, MI5 and the British army’s special reconnaissance regiment, in the injustice for which we may now spend the rest of our lives in prison.
With many thanks to: Brendan McConville, John Paul Wootton, Maghaberry Gaol, Co Antrim.

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Brendan McConville and John Paul Wootton sentenced to life in prison in a serious miscarriage of Justice – FTC2

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Justice for the Craigavon Two

Sentenced by a single Judge in a non jury Diplock court

On the evidence of a paid perjurer, an eyewitness whose eyewitness testimony was medically impossible.

Conflicting, contradictory and inconclusive forensics.

Involvement by MI5 and British Army special forces in evidence tampering, yet this evidence was still used in court.

An appeal that opened in April that was adjourned following revelations the Police Service of Northern Ireland had sabotaged the appeal process by arresting and pressuring a new defense witness.

Watch closely the reopening of the Craigavon Two appeal on October the 8th, based on this case anyone could fall foul of this system.

You are Brendan McConville, You are John Paul Wootton!!!

Justice for the Craigavon Two.

Campaigners claim misscarriage of justice ahead of appeal against conviction for murder of police officer in the North of Ireland.

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Wednesday 4 September 2013 14.11 BST

Craigavon Two suitable scapegoats in wake of killing backlash, say supporters

An appeal by two men convicted of the murder in 2009 of a police officer in Northern Ireland is scheduled for October. Supporters, including one of the Guildford Four, say the so-called Craigavon Two are victims of a miscarriage of justice.

Stephen Carroll, a constable with the Police Service of Northern Ireland, was shot dead in Craigavon, in County Armagh, in 2009 as he responded to a 999 call. He was the first police officer in Northern Ireland to be murdered after the Good Friday agreement. His death caused deep disquiet on both sides of the political divide. In 2012, two republicans, Brendan McConville and John Paul Wootton, were found guilty of his murder and jailed for life.

At the pair’s appeal, it will be claimed that the main witness against them, a man known only as witness M, is a “compulsive liar”. The case has attracted attention because a new defence witness was arrested in April, just before the appeal was originally due to be heard, which led to a postponement until October.

“It seems to us there is such a high level of uncertainty as to the factual circumstances surrounding the position that we are faced with having no alternative but to adjourn this appeal,” said the lord chief justice, Sir Declan Morgan, in postponing the appeal.

The defence lawyers have argued that the prosecution case was based on circumstantial evidence, mainly from witness M. They claim that he was known as a “Walter Mitty” character and that his evidence cannot be relied on.

The defence barrister Barry Macdonald told the earlier appeal court hearing that the prosecution case in the original trial had relied heavily on this evidence in which M claimed to have seen McConville among a group of men close to the scene where Carroll was killed.

Macdonald said a new witness had emerged who had made a sworn affidavit in which he described M as a compulsive liar. The barrister alleged that police had arrested this new witness and questioned him before he was released without charge. “It appears to have been an attempt to sabotage the appeal,” Macdonald told the court.

A campaign, which has the backing of Gerry Conlon, who was falsely imprisoned for 15 years as a member of the Guildford Four before being released in 1989, argues that the case against McConville and Wootton was “inconclusive, contradictory and in places discredited”.

Conlon said: “We can’t have innocent people going to jail and 15 years down the line them being released, their lives ruined … I believe a miscarriage of justice took place here on the basis of all the evidence I have read.”

Campaigners claim the men were victims of a system that “sought to find suitable scapegoats in the wake of the political and media backlash following the killing”.

Carroll was not only the first officer to be killed after the Good Friday agreement but his death came shortly after the attack on the Massereene barracks in which two British soldiers were killed. All three killings were widely condemned.

With many thanks to : Duncan Campbell, The Guardian.

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9 Jan 2012

DNA and car tracker ‘link suspects to Northern Ireland policeman’s death’

Trial starts into 2009 terrorist killing of PSNI officer Constable Stephen Carroll in Craigavon, north Armagh

24 May 2011

SOLICITOR FOR POLICEMAN’S KILLER: I feared arrest during appeal.

‘This has gone past the issue of [the] appeal. This has become intimidation in my view and I think a number of people in this room will agree with me, it’s now intimidation – Darragh Mackin.

A SOLICITOR for one of the men convicted of Constable Stephen Carroll’s muder has accused the PSNI of “intimidation” of defence lawyers in the case and said he was “terrified” that he would be arrested for representing his client.

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Darragh Mackin made the remarks during a public discussion organised by supporters of Co Armagh men Brendan McConville and John Paul Wotton who were convicted of shooting the officer dead in Craigavon in 2009. McConville, from Lurgan, was jailed for a minimum of 25 years while Wotton (21), from Craigavon, was told he will have to serve at least 14 years following their trial in 2011. Both men have continued to protest they had no part in the Continuity IRA sniper attack. Campaigners and the men’s legal teams have raised questions about eyewitness and forensic evidence. Last Friday Mr Mackin claimed that the PSNI had attempted to “undermine” an appeal hearing that was due to be held in April. He confirmed that his office has contacted the UN special rapporteur in connection with the case. Controversy erupted on the day of the appeal was due to begin after a defence barrister claimed police had attempted to “sabotage” the hearing.

It was also revealed that a new defence witness was arrested and questioned by police before being released without charge days before the appeal was due to begin. McConville’s legal team bbelieve they and the new witness had been under security-force surveillance in the lead-up to the appeal hearing, which will now be held in October. The solicitor says he and a colleague, Peter Corrigan, feared that that they too would be arrested.

“I will never forget the day when we went down to Brendan McConville’s appeal, obviously with members of the farmily, and it’s an absolutely terrifying fact to think there’s a chance – and Peter would agree with me on this – that me or him or both of us will be arrested at that point in time,” he said. “This has gone past the issue of [the] appeal. This has become intimidation in my view and I think a number of people in this room will agree with me, it’s now intimidatIon.” A PSNI spokesman said: “Since this matter is currently before the courts, we are unable to comment.” Shame Fein policing board member Pat (the rat) Sheehan told those at the discussion that the case “looks like a clear mmiss carriage of justice”. A PSNI spokesman said: “As a member of the board, Mr Sheehan will have opportunities to raise issues with senior officers in both open and private sessions.”

Zachary Gelevinger, is a young man from Wisconsin in the USA. Who arrived in Belfast on Wednesday to enjoy a long-timed planned first trip to Ireland, the home of his Grandmother and a lifetime dream that has turned into a nightmare !!!

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HARK:Northern Ireland Human Rights Initiative

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Zachary had been corresponding with Political Prisoner Christine Connor and as a gesture of kindness, had organised a visit with Christine on her birthday, arranged by Christine’s mother.

This act of good will was forever tarnished when the visit was cut short and Zachary was taken out of the visit by the PSNI in handcuffs under suspicion of “Dissident Activity.”

Please note again that Zachary had not stepped foot in Ireland until Wednesday.

The American Embassy was not contacted as is proper procedure and in fact when outside sources contacted the US Stated Department at the Embassy, their calls to speak with Zachary weren’t allowed through…again violating International Law.

Zachary suffers from epilepsy and may not have access to his medicines.

His case has been picked up by the law practice of Madden and Finucane and just this morning the police were granted an additional 72 hours to hold Zachary for questioning by a Belfast Judge.

What we have here is the arrogance of the PSNI at it’s most disgraceful.

Citizens in the North of Ireland have lived with constant violations of human rights by the police for longer than anyone can remember, but now visitors to the North can be arrested and held for dissident activity, even if they have never set foot in Ireland before?

By arresting a foreign citizen visiting Ireland on holiday, the PSNI have shown that as we’ve seen in the recent actions in the April appeal of Brendan McConville and John Paul Woottton, that they are answerable to no one, that they feel that they are above the law.

In this new atrocity, in ignoring the US State Department and not following proper International procedure, they are showing that the feel they are even above International law.

I beg you, do not remain silent in this case.

Zachary Gelevinger came to Belfast to visit the land of his birth and sets in chains because he chose to reach out to a Political Prisoner on her birthday.

A lot of words have been tossed around lately about this horror.

Outrage. Unjust. Evil.

There are no words to describe what this man in his early 20’s is going through and absolutely no description to describe the arrogance and vanity of the PSNI in arresting a visiting citizen from America.

If a citizen from another country has no rights in the North of Ireland, how does NI ever expect to become anything but isolated and alone?

We suffer enough in the fight to bring awareness of our own continuing human rights violations and governmental challenges to the rest of the world.

We can not allow the same to start happening to visitors and tourists.

You might as well lock the borders and toss away the key.

Please share Zachary’s story everywhere you can.

Injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere just became a reality when newly arrived global visitors can be treated as dissidents.

HARK:Northern Ireland Human Rights Initiative

JUSTICE FOR THE CRAIGAVON TWO

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IRISH TD’s RAISE CRAIGAVON TWO IN IRISH PARLIAMENT, DURING A MOTION DISCUSSING 15 YEARS SINCE THE BELFAST AGREEMENT !

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Justice for the Craigavon Two

Irish TD’S raise Craigavon Two in the Irish Parliament. during a motion discussing 15 years since the Belfast agreement.

Find below some transcripts of the debate

Eamon O Cuiv.

I am surprised that the motion does not mention justice issues, particularly those which relate to prisoners in the North of Ireland. Deputy Ó Snodaigh is well aware of the matter to which I refer because he visited a number of prisons in that jurisdiction in the company of some Deputies and Senators who have shown great interest in these issues in recent times. I will try to outline the nature of the issues to which I refer and also of the injustices that have been perpetrated. I recognise that the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Taoiseach have made representations in respect of these issues. It is important, however, to place on the public record the facts about what is happening.

I wish, first, to refer to the case of Marian McGlinchey – also known as Marian Price – and Martin Corey. Both of these individuals were released on licence many years ago. Marian was actually released in the very early 1980s. In the past two years, they were both arrested and imprisoned. Neither they nor we know what the allegations against them are. It seems extraordinary that, at this remove, someone can be put in prison and not be informed as to the nature of the evidence against them. These people were arrested and imprisoned on the order of the British Secretary of State. There is no limit to the amount of time that can be taken to hear their cases. If parole is refused, neither will be informed of the grounds for this. It is impossible to refute evidence if one does not know the nature of it. If this was happening in any other part of the world, motions of condemnation of a state which allowed such a justice system to obtain would be tabled all over the place.

Deputy Maureen O’Sullivan and I visited Marian Price in hospital yesterday. Ms Price has been in hospital for nearly a year and last week she was moved to an acute unit. She is suffering from a multitude of ailments and her immune system is breaking down as a result of the various medicines with which she is being treated. I am concerned about the ongoing incarceration of these two people.

Unfortunately, I do not have time to go into his case. Both cases are effectively detention without trial and will do more to destabilise the peace process than anything else of which one can dream.

Why were Mr. Gary Adams and Mr. Gerry McGeough, the so-called on-the-runs, picked to be put in prison? As Mr. McGeough was released after two years, it is obvious that the system does not view him as a threat to society. A part of the delay in Mr. Adams’s case has to do with who he was with he was in prison. It is extraordinary that someone could be refused parole because he or she was put into a certain part of a prison. I assure the Minister that choice of who to associate with in prison is not that great.

Regarding the so-called dissidents, a dirty protest continued for more than one year. When it concluded last year, undertakings were given in respect of change. Judging by what we were told during our visit to HM Prison Maghaberry yesterday, no change has occurred. It further transpired that many of the people in question were in prison on indefinite remand for court cases that were still awaited. The remand period can continue in such cases. This is detention without trial.

The arrests and convictions of Mr. Adams and Mr. McGeough were contrary to an international agreement between the Irish and British Governments, that being, Weston Park Agreement. I am amazed that this has not been mentioned on the Sinn Féin motion’s “To Do” list.

Serious abuses have occurred in the case of Mr. Brendan McConville and Mr. John Paul Wootton. It was due to be started in the appeal court before the prosecution stated that it had further evidence. It now appears that the prosecution was collecting intelligence on discussions held between another witness who would confound the prosecution’s evidence and his solicitor. Matters have become so serious that an application has been made to the Northern Ireland Court of Appeal to ask the Criminal Cases Review Commission to direct the police investigation, something that is possible in Northern Ireland.

Maureen O’Sullivan

I am a member of the foreign affairs committee. When we meet people from conflict areas, they take great heart from the Northern peace process. After generations of bloodshed, bitterness and deep division, peace was achieved. No one wants to see it undermined, but that is what is happening. Lasting peace cannot be achieved without justice, something that is being undermined in the North. I have raised the issue of prisoners at Maghaberry prison in Priority Questions and Topical Issues. With a group of Deputies, I visited the prisoners several times. Their human rights are being abused. I am not referring to their political views. How could a dirty protest continue for 18 months without anyone paying the prisoners a blind bit of notice? We have been told that the agreement is not being implemented in the prison.

Regarding Ms Marian Price, how could a royal prerogative of mercy that received significant coverage when given be lost so suddenly? She is the only female being held in isolation in a male jail. Her medical treatment leaves much to be desired. These are abuses of her human rights. Her hearing with the Parole Commissioners is repeatedly postponed. She has been held two years on the basis of allegations.

Equally disturbing is the case of Mr. Martin Corey, who has been in jail for three years having had his licence revoked on the basis of allegations. Following a judicial review, the judge opted to release him, but the Secretary of State prevented that from happening. He is long overdue a parole review. It will not be held until July. This is internment without trial. In a democracy, due process should be followed. Level a charge, bring a person to court and let him or her have a say. If there is a conviction, it can be appealed. Otherwise, the person serves time. So-called evidence is being produced, but it will be closed. Barristers and solicitors will effectively be going into the case blindfolded.

The sword of Damocles is hanging over others who are out on licence. We have had the Birmingham Six and the Guildford Four. We now have the Craigavon Two, men who are being held following a series of allegations, dubious circumstantial evidence and serious issues relating to the PSNI and the covert surveillance of civilians. These injustices are putting the peace process in jeopardy. Do we never learn from history? Are we trying to create more martyrs and fill the ranks of dissident groups?

I believe in people’s democratic right to a fair trial. People in the North are being denied this right. Those being held on grounds of dubious allegations are not the problem. Rather, they would be a part of the solution if the situation was being addressed correctly and fairly.

Mick Wallace

The Good Friday Agreement has been a very positive development, but we should not take things for granted. There is still work to be done if we are to ensure the long-term sustainability of the peace process. Like other Deputies in yesterday’s debate, I want to concentrate on some of the prison issues. Marian Price and Martin Corey were released on licence many years ago but were rearrested in the last few years and are now imprisoned without trial.

It is called internment. A series of abuses have occurred in the case of Brendan McConville and John Paul Wootton, known as the Craigavon Two. Allegations are weak in both cases and there are serious issues relating to the Police Service of Northern Ireland, PSNI, regarding their convictions and recent failed appeal. Injustices have the potential to put the peace process at risk.

Having visited Maghaberry Prison on three occasions over the last three months with other Members of the Oireachtas and listened to the prisoners’ side of the story, one would have to be concerned. I have no interest in republicanism, but I feel the treatment of political prisoners in Maghaberry is unjust and leaves much to be desired. Prisoners’ rights were promised in 2010 but did not materialise and this led to a dirty protest which lasted 18 months up to last December. Promises were made again following the end of the protest, and again they were not delivered. Measures were to be introduced to bring about a conflict-free environment in the prison. These were to be brought in over three phases in a 12 month period to include movement access, whereby they were promised they would be allowed to have six men on the landing at one time, three in the laundry, three in the phone room and three in the classroom. It turns out the classroom is not available to them. There are no teachers available to them. These prisoners are getting no education and are locked up in their own cells most of the day. It does not make much sense.

What ever happened to the idea that prison was meant to reform the prisoner, make him or her a better person and fit for society? They also have serious grievances about the continued use of strip-searching and the use of isolation in an effort to break particular prisoners. It would make far more sense to have a peaceful atmosphere in the prison rather than one of conflict.

Clare Daly

The issues Deputy Wallace has raised have been silenced by the mainstream media here in the South and we will ignore these issues at our peril. Not too far up the road we have a man who has been in jail for three years who meets all the criteria of the Good Friday Agreement, whose licence was revoked, allegedly for security reasons. He and his legal team have not been informed of these reasons and decisions have been made behind closed doors. The exact same situation faces Martin Corey and the very ill Marian Price, people who have not been presented with the cases against them and who have remained in custody for years. This is not the type of approach that will bring peace in the North. These people are becoming symbols of a continued injustice, and of the fact that internment without trial is still alive and well. There cannot be peace unless justice is done openly and transparently.

I am not a nationalist or a republican. I am an internationalist and am concerned about these issues very much from a human rights point of view, and that is why we have been involved in the cross-party delegations to Maghaberry Prison. It is absolutely reprehensible that the prison authorities and the establishment in the North and Britain have breached agreements and promises regarding prisoners’ conditions which should allow the men to go out onto the landings and socially interact, to get an education, to engage in handicrafts and other issues which deal with rehabilitation. This is not a way forward to bring a conflict-free environment. It is not in the interests of the prisoners or the staff in that prison. Unless we here address these issues we cannot have a lasting peace. I urge the authorities in the South to exert pressure for a desperately needed resolution of these issues.

Thomas Pringle

It is appropriate that 15 years on we should note progress and renew commitment to the Good Friday Agreement in this House. The Government’s amendment stresses that it continues to work towards the observation and implementation of human rights principles. As has been outlined by other Deputies in their contributions, the human rights of prisoners in the North are being abused on a daily basis. Martin Corey, Marian Price and the Craigavon Two are all having their human rights abused. The Government needs to step up to the mark on this and ensure it deals proactively with the British Administration because the Secretary of State is overruling the court system in the Six Counties to ensure these prisoner are kept in custody. This is internment. Holding prisoners without any notice of charge, trial date or attempt to bring them to trial is an abuse of human rights. This Government needs to ensure this is addressed and to deal with it very proactively.

The purpose of the Good Friday Agreement was to remove the circumstances that caused the conflict in the first place, but the British Government is leaving the potential for martyrs and undermining people’s confidence in the justice system. The justice system has to be an integral part of any peace process and the workings of the Good Friday Agreement.